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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama cuts short his vacation to head back to washington, while harry reid says the country is headed toward the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on efforts to avert the looming deadline from todd zwillich of public radio international. >> brown: then, geo-politics and children: russia moves to end adoptions by american parents. >> warner: what austerity measures look like at street level: we have a report from athens. >> by the end of 2013 greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. b
jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: christmas eve shootings killed two firefighters in rochester, new york and a policeman and bystander in houston, texas. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the killings, coming ten days after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. >> brown: then, we turn to egypt, and accusations of voting fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate
here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again to
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we look at this first cabinet change for the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's
earned a more formidable reputation as an analytical thinker than harold brown who was the nation's 14th defense secretary during the carter administration. a true prodigy he earned hi doctorate in physics from columbia university when he was just 21. he started his career at livermore lab in california and eventually moving to the pentagon where he became the director of defense research and engineering then air force secretary and eventually defense secretary. his ability to handle a staggering workload are legend including read and annotating 400 page briefing books overnight. during the career brown shaped fighters like the f-15 and f-16 that remain the air force's backbone fleet today. and championed jointness among the military serv before the failed iran hostage rescue mission convinced others to follow. now 85, brown continues to serve on the defense policy board and is a trustee of the center for strategic and international studies. with joyce winds low, brown recently co-authored "star- spangled security" applying lessons safeguarding america. i asked him whether jointness was
. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>
severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama care was given the seal of approval by the u.s. supreme court, now poised to take on prop 8 and the defens
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama and congressional leaders met face to face for the first time in weeks, in a last-ditch effort to avert the fiscal cliff. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we have the latest on the chances for a breakthrough-- just four days before automatic tax hikes and spending cuts hit. >> brown: then, we turn to india. ray suarez looks at the violent protests and public anger sparked by the gang rape of a young woman. >> warner: john merrow has the story of a group of california charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's
>> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their
, the focus is shifting to his potential replacement in massachusetts. senator scott brown, who was defeated last month by elizabeth warren, appears to be the clear choice for republicans. a poll conducted before the selection of kerry found brown dominating the field. the wbur poll also shows the senator topping any democrat by eight points. brown is yet to say whether he plans to run in the special election. as for the democrats, it's only clear who's not running right now. ted kennedy jr. was floated as a possible contender, but he says he's not interested. kennedy said he was grateful for the offers of support, but he considers connecticut to be his home, leaving the door open for a potential future run in that state. and actor and director ben affleck isn't ready to leave hollywood. the "argo" star, who had showed interest in politics, confirms he doesn't want kerry's seat, saying "i love massachusetts and our political process, but i am not running for office." >>> former president george h.w. bush is in the intensive care unit at houston methodist hospital this morning after suffering
that they could get it back up and running by the beginning of april of 2013. >> governor jerry brown is looking ahead at the second half of his term. in the past year he successfully persuaded voters to pass his tax initiative. he also pushed changes to the public pension system through the legislature. now he wants to focus on improving the state's water delivery system, and building the nation's first high-speed rail system. given his success in 2012, brown says that he is excited for the year to come. however, he says that he also was to make sure that state spending stays under control while new projects are moving for. >> with the new year, calif. will be getting a lot of new laws. kron 4 urs philippe de djegal highlights a few of them. >> the fine ford dealers who use metals will go up the big time. it will rise to up four times $250. if the new fine will be $1,000. the next line ithe next lot is due o birth control. it will allow them to prescribe medication. drivers of licenses. there are documented immigrants will be able to apply for a driver's license. these are for people who are in
're saying it's better than this one? >> yours has a charlie brown aspect to it. >> i think it needs me. >> reporter: what patrick needs and has is a christmas tree, with a nice plump one that grazes the ceiling rather than pierces it. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> that will definitely make you look twice, no doubt. thank you so much for starting your morning with us. much more ahead on cnn saturday morning, which starts right now. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it's 8:00 am on the east coast, 5:00 am in the west. >>> powerful national rifle association, here's tom foreman. >> hey, randi, nra officials were quiet in the days following the newtown, connecticut, shooting, giving people time to mourn. now they are speaking up and they have a lot to say. despite protesters, the president and public opinion increasingly pushing against the gun lobby, the national rifle association sent a sharp message to its leader, wayne lapierre, no retreat. >> the only thing that stops a bad guy with an a gun is a good guy with a gun. i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriat
, you have to pick up the ham today. no big deal. we make a honey mustard ham. very easy. brown sugar and add in the zest of two oranges. for that, a couple of sprigs of thyme all chopped up. while you mix that together, take some whole ground mustard and slather it on top of the half of the ham. it's like a little spackle, you know what i mean? we're building a meal here, so we need spackle for all of the layers of love we put onto it. >> what do you like? >> i like it because it has texture and bite to it. we put something sweet. it's a little tangy as well so it cuts through the brown sugar. you go ahead and put your brown sugar mixture right on top of it. you can use your hands and smash it in. get in there, willie. let's do this. >> here we go. that's a lot of sugar, too? >> yeah, it is. ham is already salty, so it's nice to add sugar to it. into the roasting pan herele a little bit of orange juice. what will happen is as this cooks in the oven at 375 degrees, a little bit of the juices are going to run down. you go in, and in about 15 minutes scoop it over the top. right before
quarterback. on top of this, brown was a guest in the mitchell home. he heard about this and called it reprehensible. but the bigger thing in an ironic twist, brown is a guy who is suing the nfl for compensatory damages for injuries related to football back in his playing days. so i think brown is going to reach out to mitchell and smooth it over. that's a horrible admission. >> and then quickly this heart-warming story. a painter out of baltimore. >> your hometown. 21-year-old darrin guest, what a great story. he spent most of his life battling muscular dystrophy but he's become an amazing artist. among his subject, members of the baltimore ravens. they have really embraced him so much so that one of the ravens commissioned guest to paint a portrait of his late brother. and obviously terrific work. very impressed not only with his work but with this young man and what he's doing with his life. e let me give you a quick reminder. bleacherreport.com for all your news. you can read about that and their amazing run. >> thank you. >>> next hour of cnn "newsroom" begins right now. >>> ha
. >> reverend brown will help them get through it. >> because i'm not giving up. >> we will take a break. stay with us. >>> welcome back. one final question, if you will. in your opinion are new year's resolutions a good idea? is it a good time to make a change in your life or promise to yourself or do you think it's a good idea to make little changes along the way, especially with work and relationships and values and plans, dreams? >> i would be of the second frame of thought that you mentioned. i think that generally our nature is to grow and change slowly. something small and manageable. there's an acronym, smart. be smart about new year resolutions if you make them at all. my experience as a man of faith, there are moments of grace to break into my life where i am able to make changes but it doesn't necessarily fall on january 1st. throughout the year god enables me to make a change. >> i don't do resolutions. i just will not do it. i think that maybe when the new year comes in, before it comes in, i just want to live better and do better. whatever that means, and whatever that takes, i a
to be the panacea that i think governor brown and the california legislature had predicted. last year as a matter of fact i think we created about 3,000 jobs in green energy, that's total. that's all renewables. and at the pace that jerry brown promised, 500,000 new jobs over the next 10 years, it will take him 167 years to actually make good on that promise. david: by the way, the "wall street journal" looked at the government's figures, the federal government's figures about how many jobs were supposedly created by wind power, by a 4 billion dollars wind power project involved over 30 wind power farms, and the government claimed there were 7,000 jobs. the journal sent reporters and called in to each one of those locations, found out there were only 300 jobs. the government said 7,000. in actuality there were only 300. you can't even depend on government stats to back up their job creation numbers. >> well, they put a tremendous amount of investment into this green jobs right now. and frankly the thing we worry about is governor brown has now mandated that 33% all of energy has to come from rene
. the brown and the gray. what are the differences between them and how are they clashing now that we get closer and closer to the fiscal cliff? >> the brown and the gray is a phrase i've been using for the last few years to describe the two giant generations that will shape american life in the coming decades. the brown is the millennial, the most diverse in american history. over 40% nonwhite. the gray is the aging baby boom which is joining the silent generation in a huge senior cohort that is 80% white. and they have very different political inclinations, preferences and different interests at stake in the fiscal cliff and budget negotiations. on the one hand, taxes verse spending and so does the kind of spending. discretionary spending mostly investments in the future. entitlement spending mostly income security for the older generation. >> so who benefits if we do cross the fiscal cliff? >> i think there is no question that getting the debt and deficit under control is in the interests of younger generations so they are not saddled with debt solely for our current consumption. but h
and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of thing. the idea of actually depicting presidents t idea of doing that is you can't take it seriously, that kind of thing. so the idea that peter morgan who is a well respected writer but hadn't found his voice up to that point. it wasn't until he wrote "the deal" he found his groove. having him on board and having proper producers behind it gave it a seriousness and a weight that nothing had had before that was looking at these sort of people. so "the deal" was on tv. i was offered the part and no one knew what to expect. everyone expected it to fail and not work. and i think through a combination of factors, the tone was right and it was acceptable and suddenly once the tone was acceptable and people were tible accept watching a drama which includes tony blair in bed. snons you take that seriously it opens an entire new unive
play. former tackle brown on the left admitting intention a.m.ly missed a black so his own team's qb would get hurt. brown said he was upset scott mitchell was playing poorly in 1994. brown says now he completely regrets it. mitchell says this revelation is painful. >> kelly: painful indeed, his own teammate. >> juliet: yeah. >> kelly: talk about friendly fire. >> juliet: yeah, really. >> kelly: secretary of state hillary clinton finally expected to return to work next week. she spent the last three weeks recovering from a stomach virus and concussion that forced her to miss her date to testify in the benghazi attack that killed four americans in september. lawmakers say until hillary clinton testifies, they'll hold up john kerry has confirmation for secretary of state. >> eric: joining us now is sout carolina congressman and member of the house foreign affairs committee, mr. jeff duncan. good to have you on. first of all, why haven't we heard from hillary clinton? i understand concussions. i know them all too well. but really? three, four weeks now to testify? >> well, she needs
they had represented the brown on and a tape of him as saying the world is only 9000 years old going off the literal translation. people like that generally lack the ability to look at complex issues and try to simplify it. had the same time -- at the same time, the one to seem like they are preaching to us about the bible and abortion are the ones who seemingly lack the ability to live the way christ told them they are supposed to live. they gave to the rich. they let the thursday turn to dust and the sick by. host: here are some more pew research numbers. differing views on the impact of religion's influence on society. is religion increasing or losing its influence on american life? is it a good thing or bad thing? 25% said religion is increasing its influence while 66% said it is losing its influence. of those numbers, 49% said it was a bad thing, 12% said it was a good thing. views of religious institutions. this is the percentage of people will agree that churches and other religious organizations are too involved in politics. the general public says 46% agreed. but unofficially at
brown v board said after segregationist contrary to the constitution then you have a case that it arises out of little rock. little rock begins when a judge says we mean that. by the way the first year after brown what happened? the second year nothing. the third year they finally get around to doing something and the judge says put those children in the schools and so what happens? some of us can remember the governor of arkansas called on his militia to get them into the school and to keep them out. and the congressman down there who was a moderate arrange a meeting with eisenhower whose president and president eisenhower and its roof of a governor come he goes into the room, and he says let them do it, let them do it, i will integrate the school and he goes out of the room and tells the press the opposite. and he says the president dressed me down like a sergeant, like a general tour system assurgent. that's what happens. then eisenhower's is what do i have to do coming and he says to jimmy byrnes the governor from south carolina what do i do, and burns was a moderate democrat that re
in western new york, it was a brown ground last christmas. so certainly all the snow we've seen in the great lakes will certainly allow for a white christmas and great skiing. all the ski resorts in vermont and new hampshire down to snowshoe, west virginia, picking up a foot and a half to see two feet to the west. upper midwest. so a white christmas meteorologically means that there's an inch of snow on the ground on christmas morning. it doesn't have to be falling. there just has to be an inch of snow on the ground. we're looking at christmas and also the days up to it and a little after it if you're traveling. a few interesting things happening. the west san francisco area has been ensconced in rain and clouds and travel trbs. tomorrow they get into it again. by monday, the west coast clears out, but here's what we're watching for the tuesday to thursday time period. so christmas and then traveling after that. watch what happens here in the southeast. an area of low pressure develops on tuesday. so it may not be a white christmas in the southeast, in places like new orleans, birmingham, li
: beautiful. look at that. golden brown. >> golden brown. pounded veal. breaded and deep fried. they're really good. and i always tell everybody, like i said in the kitchen, a lot of love into those to get them done right. >> the wiener schnitzel. >> i got the schity nitzel, it' awesome, and the slovenian potatoes that the waitress recommended. highly recommended. and the stuffed cabbage, awesome. >> reporter: you don't have to be old or even from the old country to enjoy this place. >> i'm celebrating my birthday. i got my friends together, thought we'd do something different. having some fun. >> reporter: the nice thing is after you've had a good meal, you probably had the strudel, you can go out and burn it all off. >> they've been coming here since day one. >> reporter: get the dessert and get dancing. i hope you enjoyed it. if you're ever in cleveland, you know what they say -- stop on by. in the meantime, i'm going to go work off some of the food. ♪ >> reporter: martin savidge, cnn, cleveland. [ male announcer ] this december, remember you can stay in and share something ♪ or you can
to a roller rink where trevor, sporting a white tux and brown skates, proposed to kathy while the roller derby teammates watched. >> the old brown rental skates and i roller skated out there. i roller skated around her for a minute. then i came and popped the question. >> you didn't fall. >> reporter: when they tied the knot, two decades after trevor wrote that letter, there it was. >> just cemented even more that, you know, we were meant to be together. >> reporter: the wedding photographer snapped a photo of the letter and posted it on line. and the couple's story went viral. kathy's advice to those looking for love -- >> don't discount your good friends because, you know, best friends can turn out to be the greatest of love. >> reporter: for "today," nbc news, atlanta. >> sweet story. >> yeah. i like that "don't let anyone see this." we need the "do you like me, yes, no." -- >> check the box. >> we'll go to weather and dylan. >>> good morning. i'm confused. i thought it was the weekend, but we've got savannah. we've got lester showed up on his day off. we've got everybody here from the week
pounds of thermal protection. it would last forever. it just turns brown and does not char. >> thank you for being such a rock star engineer. i really look up to that. you have spoken this whole evening about inspiration and the fact that everyone that you look up to was inspired at some time. i wonder if you have your own branch whose sole purpose is to inspire youth? >> you know, i am very familiar. i was judged at the first u.s. first competition. i was invited to be a judge and the competition was just too high schools in manchester the first year. so i am very familiar and supportive of that. i gave a talk at a brand new charter school in my home town where they are starting off kids with robotics between the ages of 6 and 13. boy, are they excited to go to school. let's see. the big problem that we had that we never could even do a student summer co-op program -- the problem is, our company was so small that it was hard for us to build barriers from one project to another. everyone of them essentially is nonpublic. richard branson's program, he tells everyone about it. in almost ev
prosecutions. i did the same thing in ohio with senator brown in cleveland. same witnesses, ohio election officials and questions -- same questions, same answers. it's come down to this. elections in america are supposed to be a contest between candidates with voters making the ultimate judgment. instead into many state elections become a contest between voters and special interest groups like alec, which are hell-bent on limiting the right of americans to vote. look what happened during this last election. things that i think need to be changed are embarrassing to us. how can we be satisfied with our fellow citizens stand in line for seven hours to vote until 2:30 a.m.? doesn't make sense for state legislatures to reduce early voting opportunities? and the flexibility many working americans need to exercise their right to vote. how can we watch laws being passed in legislatures requiring identification which the legislators know full well that hundreds of thousands of people will never be able to obtain in time to vote? should we be to appointed by the increasing number of increasing num
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)